Efficacy of Additional Solifenacin Succinate Therapy in Females with Urinary Tract Infection

Document Type : Editorial

Authors

1 Department of Urology, Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, Zahedan, Iran

2 Urology Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran

Abstract

Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a collective word for diseases involving any portion of the urinary tract and it’s the most common infection in local primary care that has suffered from it by up to 60 percent of females and has at least one symptomatic UTI in a lifetime. UTI can have consequences like a kidney infection, infections of the urinary tract, and eventually, toxic septicemia. UTI is often confused with wide-spectrum antibiotics, so it is imperative to characterize resistance patterns to enhance in-vitro antibiotic strategies. According to previous studies, the use of anticholinergics to relieve UTI symptoms has never been investigated. This research is the first randomized trial of anticholinergic like solifenacin succinate (with a strong affinity for smooth muscle receptors M3) to be used to treat and improve UTI.

Highlights

  • UTI can have consequences like kidney infection, infections of the urinary tract, and toxic septicemia.
  • UTI is often confused with wide-spectrum antibiotics.

Keywords


Editorial: Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a collective word for diseases involving any portion of the urinary tract and it's the most common infection in local primary care that has suffered from it by up to 60 percent of females and has at least one symptomatic UTI in a lifetime. UTI happens in both sexes, but for anatomical, hormonal, and pregnancy reasons is more prevalent in females (1).

UTI can have consequences like a kidney infection, infections of the urinary tract, and eventually, toxic septicemia. Increasing drug resistance has made it essential in the experimental field to assess the pattern of antibiotic resistance (2, 3). UTI is often confused with wide-spectrum antibiotics, so it is imperative to characterize resistance patterns to enhance in-vitro antibiotic strategies (4, 5).

According to previous studies and research, the use of anticholinergics to relieve UTI symptoms has never been investigated. This research is the first randomized trial of anticholinergic like solifenacin succinate, with a strong affinity for smooth muscle receptors M3, to be used to treat and improve UTI (6-8).

Rahardjo HE et al., proposed anticholinergics in the therapy of low-grade UTI as a therapeutic adjuvant for experimental antibiotics. Due to its impact on decreasing storage symptoms in patients with overactive bladder (OAB), anticholinergics were selected (9).

In the current investigation, patients in two groups (solifenacin succinate and levofloxacin) and (placebo and levofloxacin) demonstrated (p-value<0.05) a decrease in patient perception of bladder condition (PPBC) score and overactive bladder symptom score (OABSS) from start to end of therapy (7, 9), and a significant reduction in daily micturition frequency in UTI patients (10).

So, solifenacin succinate has made patients with OAB have a better understanding of their bladder symptoms and quality of life. Five mg solifenacin provides dose titration within 4-6 weeks of therapy and this may increase the efficacy of treatment and provide optimal control of OAB (11).

Eventually, it was suggested that solifenacin succinate at standard doses can be an effective and safe means of handling patients' symptoms of overactive relapse after UTI (12).

On the other hand, a recent study showed that the adding of solifenacin succinate to levofloxacin compared to experimental therapy with levofloxacin alone in UTI patients showed no significant signs compared to a reduction in OABSS and PPBC scores (9).

 

Authors' contributions

 BN was responsible for study conception. AM wrote the manuscript.

 

Acknowledgments

 Special thanks to Urology Research Center (URC), Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

 

Conflict of interest

All authors claim that there is no competing interest.

 

Funding

 There was no founding.

  

Ethics statement

 Not applicable.

 

 Data availability

Not applicable.

 

 Abbreviations

 OAB         Overactive bladder

 OABSS     Overactive bladder symptom score

 PPBC        Patient perception of bladder condition

 UTI             Urinary tract infection 

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